That Great Smell

The Mountain TV

You know, my mother started me on my love for fires. We had a huge fireplace in our house growing up and at the first sign of cold weather, my mom would ask my dad to build a fire as she decorated the house for fall. My mom was the ultimate entertainer and to her, the house was a stage. My dad used to get firewood cut to 36″ to match the large fireplace and grate. He had some real blazes in that house.

Going forward, I had that appreciation for fires as I made my way through ski lodges, and anytime I had a moment to stand by a fire, I would do it, and take in the warmth and the great smell of wood smoke. In Colonial Williamsburg, one of my favorite destinations, they build fires on the street corners in the winter and the period actors discuss the merits of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness warming themselves in front of those ” army stacked” blazes.

I took matters into my own hands when we built our last house and had Teddy Hall come down from the mountains and build a 30’retainer wall, fireplace and bench all out of stone from the mountains. I learned what a shiner was. It is the flat facing stone that is strategically placed amid the dry stack of the stones that give some texture to the stacked stone. Teddy deposited 18 ton of stone in our yard and began his magic culminating in what I always thought was a spectacular fireplace.

My son Jack and I would scour for deadfall with my chainsaw and load up my Jeep with free firewood. He was a bit concerned as a young kid about my sources but I explained that we were doing a favor to the environment. At least that is what I told him. LOL!! Anytime I saw wood that was available, I grabbed it and did whatever I needed to do to get it cut and split. All part of the process of building a great fire in a great fireplace. We had fires all year long as it is a great bug zapper in the summer and a warm place in the winter. Many nights I spent in front of that fireplace contemplating what was next in our lives. When my folks passed, I used to sit out back and look up at the stars wondering where exactly they had gone. I saw heaven in those stars and planets and thought about what my folks saw now? Did they see me looking for them? I drifted off to sleep many nights in front of that fireplace. My brother in law, Duke, called it the Mountain TV as it provided entertainment for many guests to our house for many years.

The suspect Christmas wreath.

Duke would build fires so large in our fireplace that he would catch the Christmas wreath on fire many a night. The remnants of that wreath were a reminder of Christmas and a tradition that lasted many years. If the wreath didn’t catch fire, Duke didn’t build it big enough and Christmas was not complete. We had some other funny times in front of that fireplace. Like when my friend Dean melted the soles of his shoes onto the hearth. I peeled them off the next day and mailed them back to him. I have seen some other amazing things at other fireplaces. Like ski boot shells melting or gloves smoking as they hung to dry with the owners frantically trying to salvage the boots and gloves. People don’t realize how hot a fireplace can get.

The other day, I was riding my mountain bike and I smelled wood smoke coming from the house in the valley below. I can pick up that smell from far away and it always brings a smile to my face and a reminder that my favorite time of the year approaches- the fall, Thanksgiving, Christmas and winter. Probably one of the things I miss the most in moving from my former house to our current one is the fact that I had to leave my fireplace. No more wood smoke, no more sitting out back, but my neighbor Tim has a nice fireplace and when I smell the wood smoke drifting my way, I am thankful that he invites us to come up and enjoy. Don’t get me wrong, I like where we live but it was tough to leave the Teddy Hall masterpiece.

Laurel Mountain Outdoor Fireplace

If you have a nice fireplace- use it. And if you visit ski areas, lodges, or other places where fireplaces are lit during the season, take the time to sit and take in the smell, the warmth, and the quiet time reflecting in front of a roaring fire. Thanks for reading and RIP Teddy Hall. You made our life rich indeed. Thanks for reading.

8 thoughts on “That Great Smell

  1. kevinbock says:

    Another great story! Thanks for sharing!Kevin BockSent via the Samsung Galaxy S10+, an AT&T 5G Evolution capable smartphone

  2. Paul K. Vey says:

    Awesome work Pat. I couldn’t agree more.

    A few years ago my neighbor and I used to have a rivalry to see who would start the first fire in the fall because we could each smell the smoke coming from one another’s house. It was great fun.

    Thanks for capturing those great moments of fireplaces and being outdoors and smelling the great smell of a wood fire ________________________________

    Paul K. Vey , Esquire Pietragallo Gordon Alfano Bosick & Raspanti, LLP One Oxford Centre, 38th Floor Pittsburgh, PA 15219 Office: (412) 263-1823 | Fax: (412) 263-4248 PKV@Pietragallo.com| BIO|vCard Connect with me on LinkedIn:

    This electronic mail message, and any attachments transmitted with it, contain confidential information, intended only for the named addressee(s). If you are not the intended recipient or the person responsible for delivering this e-mail to the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, distribution, copying or disclosure of this communication is strictly prohibited. If you have received this e-mail in error, please immediately notify Pietragallo Gordon Alfano Bosick & Raspanti, LLP by reply e-mail, and delete all copies of this communication from your computer and network. Thank you.

  3. Bill Belch says:

    Indeed Pat that wonderful smell of wood burning I to enjoy my mountain TV ,Not a teddy Hall crafted but the enjoyment never fails.

  4. Art Bonn says:

    Primed the fireplace last night, we had to have that smell! Good post.

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